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Faust Online Lesen


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Faust Online Lesen

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Faust: Eine Tragödie [erster Teil] by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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Wie wenig das dem echten Künstler zieme!

To stroll with you, Sir Doctor, flatters; 'Tis honor, profit, unto me. But I, alone, would shun these shallow matters, Since all that's coarse provokes my enmity.

This fiddling, shouting, ten-pin rolling I hate,—these noises of the throng: They rave, as Satan were their sports controlling.

And call it mirth, and call it song! All for the dance the shepherd dressed, In ribbons, wreath, and gayest vest Himself with care arraying: Around the linden lass and lad Already footed it like mad: Hurrah!

The fiddle-bow was playing. He broke the ranks, no whit afraid, And with his elbow punched a maid, Who stood, the dance surveying: The buxom wench, she turned and said: "Now, you I call a stupid-head!

They first grew red, and then grew warm, And rested, panting, arm in arm,— Hurrah! And hips and elbows straying.

Now, don't be so familiar here! How many a one has fooled his dear, Waylaying and betraying! And yet, he coaxed her soon aside, And round the linden sounded wide.

And the fiddle-bow was playing. Sir Doctor, it is good of you, That thus you condescend, to-day, Among this crowd of merry folk, A highly-learned man, to stray.

Then also take the finest can, We fill with fresh wine, for your sake: I offer it, and humbly wish That not alone your thirst is slake,— That, as the drops below its brink, So many days of life you drink!

In truth, 'tis well and fitly timed, That now our day of joy you share, Who heretofore, in evil days, Gave us so much of helping care. Still many a man stands living here, Saved by your father's skillful hand, That snatched him from the fever's rage And stayed the plague in all the land.

Then also you, though but a youth, Went into every house of pain: Many the corpses carried forth, But you in health came out again.

With what a feeling, thou great man, must thou Receive the people's honest veneration! How lucky he, whose gifts his station With such advantages endow!

Thou'rt shown to all the younger generation: Each asks, and presses near to gaze; The fiddle stops, the dance delays. Thou goest, they stand in rows to see, And all the caps are lifted high; A little more, and they would bend the knee As if the Holy Host came by.

A few more steps ascend, as far as yonder stone! Here, lost in thought, I've lingered oft alone, When foolish fasts and prayers my life tormented.

Here, rich in hope and firm in faith, With tears, wrung hands and sighs, I've striven, The end of that far-spreading death Entreating from the Lord of Heaven!

Now like contempt the crowd's applauses seem: Couldst thou but read, within mine inmost spirit, How little now I deem, That sire or son such praises merit!

My father's was a sombre, brooding brain, Which through the holy spheres of Nature groped and wandered, And honestly, in his own fashion, pondered With labor whimsical, and pain: Who, in his dusky work-shop bending, With proved adepts in company, Made, from his recipes unending, Opposing substances agree.

There was a Lion red, a wooer daring, Within the Lily's tepid bath espoused, And both, tormented then by flame unsparing, By turns in either bridal chamber housed.

If then appeared, with colors splendid, The young Queen in her crystal shell, This was the medicine—the patients' woes soon ended, And none demanded: who got well?

Thus we, our hellish boluses compounding, Among these vales and hills surrounding, Worse than the pestilence, have passed. Thousands were done to death from poison of my giving; And I must hear, by all the living, The shameless murderers praised at last!

Why, therefore, yield to such depression? A good man does his honest share In exercising, with the strictest care, The art bequeathed to his possession!

Dost thou thy father honor, as a youth? Then may his teaching cheerfully impel thee: Dost thou, as man, increase the stores of truth?

Then may thine own son afterwards excel thee. O happy he, who still renews The hope, from Error's deeps to rise forever!

That which one does not know, one needs to use; And what one knows, one uses never. But let us not, by such despondence, so The fortune of this hour embitter!

Mark how, beneath the evening sunlight's glow, The green-embosomed houses glitter! The glow retreats, done is the day of toil; It yonder hastes, new fields of life exploring; Ah, that no wing can lift me from the soil, Upon its track to follow, follow soaring!

Then would I see eternal Evening gild The silent world beneath me glowing, On fire each mountain-peak, with peace each valley filled, The silver brook to golden rivers flowing.

The mountain-chain, with all its gorges deep, Would then no more impede my godlike motion; And now before mine eyes expands the ocean With all its bays, in shining sleep!

Yet, finally, the weary god is sinking; The new-born impulse fires my mind,— I hasten on, his beams eternal drinking, The Day before me and the Night behind, Above me heaven unfurled, the floor of waves beneath me,— A glorious dream!

Yet in each soul is born the pleasure Of yearning onward, upward and away, When o'er our heads, lost in the vaulted azure, The lark sends down his flickering lay,— When over crags and piny highlands The poising eagle slowly soars, And over plains and lakes and islands The crane sails by to other shores.

I've had, myself, at times, some odd caprices, But never yet such impulse felt, as this is. One soon fatigues, on woods and fields to look, Nor would I beg the bird his wing to spare us: How otherwise the mental raptures bear us From page to page, from book to book!

Then winter nights take loveliness untold, As warmer life in every limb had crowned you; And when your hands unroll some parchment rare and old, All Heaven descends, and opens bright around you!

One impulse art thou conscious of, at best; O, never seek to know the other! Two souls, alas! One with tenacious organs holds in love And clinging lust the world in its embraces; The other strongly sweeps, this dust above, Into the high ancestral spaces.

If there be airy spirits near, 'Twixt Heaven and Earth on potent errands fleeing, Let them drop down the golden atmosphere, And bear me forth to new and varied being!

Yea, if a magic mantle once were mine, To waft me o'er the world at pleasure, I would not for the costliest stores of treasure— Not for a monarch's robe—the gift resign.

Invoke not thus the well-known throng, Which through the firmament diffused is faring, And danger thousand-fold, our race to wrong. In every quarter is preparing.

They gladly hearken, prompt for injury,— Gladly obey, because they gladly cheat us; From Heaven they represent themselves to be, And lisp like angels, when with lies they meet us.

But, let us go! At night, one learns his house to prize:— Why stand you thus, with such astonished eyes? What, in the twilight, can your mind so trouble?

Seest thou the spiral circles, narrowing faster, Which he, approaching, round us seems to wind? A streaming trail of fire, if I see rightly, Follows his path of mystery.

It may be that your eyes deceive you slightly; Naught but a plain black poodle do I see. It seems to me that with enchanted cunning He snares our feet, some future chain to bind.

I see him timidly, in doubt, around us running, Since, in his master's stead, two strangers doth he find. A dog thou seest, and not a phantom, here!

Behold him stop—upon his belly crawl—His tail set wagging: canine habits, all! Stand still, and you will see him wait; Address him, and he gambols straight; If something's lost, he'll quickly bring it,— Your cane, if in the stream you fling it.

No doubt you're right: no trace of mind, I own, Is in the beast: I see but drill, alone. The dog, when he's well educated, Is by the wisest tolerated.

Yes, he deserves your favor thoroughly,— The clever scholar of the students, he! Behind me, field and meadow sleeping, I leave in deep, prophetic night, Within whose dread and holy keeping The better soul awakes to light.

The wild desires no longer win us, The deeds of passion cease to chain; The love of Man revives within us, The love of God revives again.

Be still, thou poodle; make not such racket and riot! Why at the threshold wilt snuffing be? Behind the stove repose thee in quiet!

My softest cushion I give to thee. As thou, up yonder, with running and leaping Amused us hast, on the mountain's crest,. Ah, when, within our narrow chamber The lamp with friendly lustre glows, Flames in the breast each faded ember, And in the heart, itself that knows.

Then Hope again lends sweet assistance, And Reason then resumes her speech: One yearns, the rivers of existence, The very founts of Life, to reach.

Snarl not, poodle! To the sound that rises, The sacred tones that my soul embrace, This bestial noise is out of place. We are used to see, that Man despises What he never comprehends, And the Good and the Beautiful vilipends, Finding them often hard to measure: Will the dog, like man, snarl his displeasure?

But ah! I feel, though will thereto be stronger, Contentment flows from out my breast no longer. Why must the stream so soon run dry and fail us, And burning thirst again assail us?

Therein I've borne so much probation! And yet, this want may be supplied us; We call the Supernatural to guide us; We pine and thirst for Revelation, Which nowhere worthier is, more nobly sent, Than here, in our New Testament.

I feel impelled, its meaning to determine,— With honest purpose, once for all, The hallowed Original To change to my beloved German.

He opens a volume, and commences. The Word? If by the Spirit I am truly taught. Then thus: "In the Beginning was the Thought " This first line let me weigh completely, Lest my impatient pen proceed too fleetly.

Is it the Thought which works, creates, indeed? Yet, as I write, a warning is suggested, That I the sense may not have fairly tested.

The Spirit aids me: now I see the light! If I must share my chamber with thee, Poodle, stop that howling, prithee! Cease to bark and bellow!

Such a noisy, disturbing fellow I'll no longer suffer near me. One of us, dost hear me! Must leave, I fear me. No longer guest-right I bestow; The door is open, art free to go.

But what do I see in the creature? Is that in the course of nature? Is't actual fact? How long and broad my poodle grows!

He rises mightily: A canine form that cannot be! What a spectre I've harbored thus! He resembles a hippopotamus, With fiery eyes, teeth terrible to see: O, now am I sure of thee!

For all of thy half-hellish brood The Key of Solomon is good. Some one, within, is caught! Stay without, follow him not! Like the fox in a snare, Quakes the old hell-lynx there.

Take heed—look about! Back and forth hover, Under and over, And he'll work himself out. If your aid avail him, Let it not fail him; For he, without measure, Has wrought for our pleasure.

First, to encounter the beast, The Words of the Four be addressed: Salamander, shine glorious! Wave, Undine, as bidden! Sylph, be thou hidden! Gnome, be laborious!

Who knows not their sense These elements ,— Their properties And power not sees,— No mastery he inherits Over the Spirits. Vanish in flaming ether, Salamander!

Flow foamingly together, Undine! Shine in meteor-sheen, Sylph! Bring help to hearth and shelf. Step forward, and finish thus! Of the Four, no feature Lurks in the creature.

Quiet he lies, and grins disdain: Not yet, it seems, have I given him pain. Now, to undisguise thee, Hear me exorcise thee!

Art thou, my gay one, Hell's fugitive stray-one? The sign witness now, Before which they bow, The cohorts of Hell!

Base Being, hearest thou? Knowest and fearest thou The One, unoriginate, Named inexpressibly, Through all Heaven impermeate, Pierced irredressibly!

Behind the stove still banned, See it, an elephant, expand! It fills the space entire, Mist-like melting, ever faster. Thou seest, not vain the threats I bring thee: With holy fire I'll scorch and sting thee!

Wait not to know The threefold dazzling glow! Wait not to know The strongest art within my hands! Why such a noise?

What are my lord's commands? This was the poodle's real core, A travelling scholar, then? The casus is diverting.

A question small, it seems, For one whose mind the Word so much despises; Who, scorning all external gleams, The depths of being only prizes. With all you gentlemen, the name's a test, Whereby the nature usually is expressed.

Who art thou, then? Part of that Power, not understood, Which always wills the Bad, and always works the Good. I am the Spirit that Denies!

And justly so: for all things, from the Void Called forth, deserve to be destroyed: 'Twere better, then, were naught created.

Thus, all which you as Sin have rated,— Destruction,—aught with Evil blent,— That is my proper element. The modest truth I speak to thee. And yet, the struggle fails; since Light, howe'er it weaves, Still, fettered, unto bodies cleaves: It flows from bodies, bodies beautifies; By bodies is its course impeded; And so, but little time is needed, I hope, ere, as the bodies die, it dies!

I see the plan thou art pursuing: Thou canst not compass general ruin, And hast on smaller scale begun.

And truly 'tis not much, when all is done. That which to Naught is in resistance set,— The Something of this clumsy world,—has yet, With all that I have undertaken, Not been by me disturbed or shaken: From earthquake, tempest, wave, volcano's brand, Back into quiet settle sea and land!

And that damned stuff, the bestial, human brood,— What use, in having that to play with? How many have I made away with!

And ever circulates a newer, fresher blood. It makes me furious, such things beholding: From Water, Earth, and Air unfolding, A thousand germs break forth and grow, In dry, and wet, and warm, and chilly; And had I not the Flame reserved, why, really, There's nothing special of my own to show!

So, to the actively eternal Creative force, in cold disdain You now oppose the fist infernal, Whose wicked clench is all in vain! Some other labor seek thou rather, Queer Son of Chaos, to begin!

Well, we'll consider: thou canst gather My views, when next I venture in. Might I, perhaps, depart at present?

Why thou shouldst ask, I don't perceive. Though our acquaintance is so recent, For further visits thou hast leave.

The window's here, the door is yonder; A chimney, also, you behold. I must confess that forth I may not wander, My steps by one slight obstacle controlled,— The wizard's-foot, that on your threshold made is.

The pentagram prohibits thee? Why, tell me now, thou Son of Hades, If that prevents, how cam'st thou in to me?

Could such a spirit be so cheated? Inspect the thing: the drawing's not completed. The outer angle, you may see, Is open left—the lines don't fit it.

Well,—Chance, this time, has fairly hit it! And thus, thou'rt prisoner to me? It seems the business has succeeded. The poodle naught remarked, as after thee he speeded; But other aspects now obtain: The Devil can't get out again.

For Devils and for spectres this is law: Where they have entered in, there also they withdraw. The first is free to us; we're governed by the second.

In Hell itself, then, laws are reckoned? That's well! So might a compact be Made with you gentlemen—and binding,—surely? All that is promised shall delight thee purely; No skinflint bargain shalt thou see.

But this is not of swift conclusion; We'll talk about the matter soon. And now, I do entreat this boon— Leave to withdraw from my intrusion.

Release me, now! I soon shall come again; Then thou, at will, mayst question and compel me. I have not snares around thee cast; Thyself hast led thyself into the meshes.

Who traps the Devil, hold him fast! Not soon a second time he'll catch a prey so precious. An't please thee, also I'm content to stay, And serve thee in a social station; But stipulating, that I may With arts of mine afford thee recreation.

My friend, thou'lt win, past all pretences, More in this hour to soothe thy senses, Than in the year's monotony.

That which the dainty spirits sing thee, The lovely pictures they shall bring thee, Are more than magic's empty show.

Thy scent will be to bliss invited; Thy palate then with taste delighted, Thy nerves of touch ecstatic glow! All unprepared, the charm I spin: We're here together, so begin!

Vanish, ye darking Arches above him! Loveliest weather, Born of blue ether, Break from the sky! O that the darkling Clouds had departed!

Starlight is sparkling, Tranquiller-hearted Suns are on high. Heaven's own children In beauty bewildering, Waveringly bending, Pass as they hover; Longing unending Follows them over.

They, with their glowing Garments, out-flowing, Cover, in going, Landscape and bower, Where, in seclusion, Lovers are plighted, Lost in illusion.

Bower on bower! Tendrils unblighted! And the winged races Drink, and fly onward— Fly ever sunward To the enticing Islands, that flatter, Dipping and rising Light on the water!

Hark, the inspiring Sound of their quiring! See, the entrancing Whirl of their dancing! All in the air are Freer and fairer. Some of them scaling Boldly the highlands, Others are sailing, Circling the islands; Others are flying; Life-ward all hieing,— All for the distant Star of existent Rapture and Love!

He sleeps! Enough, ye fays! Yet, for the threshold's magic which controlled him, The Devil needs a rat's quick tooth. I use no lengthened invocation: Here rustles one that soon will work my liberation.

The lord of rats and eke of mice, Of flies and bed-bugs, frogs and lice, Summons thee hither to the door-sill, To gnaw it where, with just a morsel Of oil, he paints the spot for thee:— There com'st thou, hopping on to me!

To work, at once! The point which made me craven Is forward, on the ledge, engraven. Another bite makes free the door: So, dream thy dreams, O Faust, until we meet once more!

Am I again so foully cheated? Remains there naught of lofty spirit-sway, But that a dream the Devil counterfeited, And that a poodle ran away?

This life of earth, whatever my attire, Would pain me in its wonted fashion. Too old am I to play with passion; Too young, to be without desire.

What from the world have I to gain? Thou shalt abstain—renounce—refrain! Such is the everlasting song That in the ears of all men rings,— That unrelieved, our whole life long, Each hour, in passing, hoarsely sings.

In very terror I at morn awake, Upon the verge of bitter weeping, To see the day of disappointment break, To no one hope of mine—not one—its promise keeping:— That even each joy's presentiment With wilful cavil would diminish, With grinning masks of life prevent My mind its fairest work to finish!

Then, too, when night descends, how anxiously Upon my couch of sleep I lay me: There, also, comes no rest to me, But some wild dream is sent to fray me.

The God that in my breast is owned Can deeply stir the inner sources; The God, above my powers enthroned, He cannot change external forces.

So, by the burden of my days oppressed, Death is desired, and Life a thing unblest! O fortunate, for whom, when victory glances, The bloody laurels on the brow he bindeth!

Whom, after rapid, maddening dances, In clasping maiden-arms he findeth! O would that I, before that spirit-power, Ravished and rapt from life, had sunken!

Though some familiar tone, retrieving My thoughts from torment, led me on, And sweet, clear echoes came, deceiving A faith bequeathed from Childhood's dawn, Yet now I curse whate'er entices And snares the soul with visions vain; With dazzling cheats and dear devices Confines it in this cave of pain!

Cursed be, at once, the high ambition Wherewith the mind itself deludes! Cursed be the glare of apparition That on the finer sense intrudes!

Cursed be the lying dream's impression Of name, and fame, and laurelled brow! Cursed, all that flatters as possession, As wife and child, as knave and plow!

Cursed Mammon be, when he with treasures To restless action spurs our fate! Cursed when, for soft, indulgent leisures, He lays for us the pillows straight!

Cursed be the vine's transcendent nectar,— The highest favor Love lets fall! Cursed, also, Hope! And cursed be Patience most of all!

Thou hast it destroyed, The beautiful world, With powerful fist: In ruin 'tis hurled, By the blow of a demigod shattered! The scattered Fragments into the Void we carry, Deploring The beauty perished beyond restoring.

Mightier For the children of men, Brightlier Build it again, In thine own bosom build it anew! Bid the new career Commence, With clearer sense, And the new songs of cheer Be sung thereto!

Hear them, to deeds and passion Counsel in shrewd old-fashion! Into the world of strife, Out of this lonely life That of senses and sap has betrayed thee, They would persuade thee.

This nursing of the pain forego thee, That, like a vulture, feeds upon thy breast! The worst society thou find'st will show thee Thou art a man among the rest.

But 'tis not meant to thrust Thee into the mob thou hatest! I am not one of the greatest, Yet, wilt thou to me entrust Thy steps through life, I'll guide thee,— Will willingly walk beside thee,— Will serve thee at once and forever With best endeavor, And, if thou art satisfied, Will as servant, slave, with thee abide.

The Devil is an egotist, And is not apt, without a why or wherefore, "For God's sake," others to assist. Speak thy conditions plain and clear!

With such a servant danger comes, I fear. When thou hast dashed this world to pieces, The other, then, its place may fill.

Here, on this earth, my pleasures have their sources; Yon sun beholds my sorrows in his courses; And when from these my life itself divorces, Let happen all that can or will!

I'll hear no more: 'tis vain to ponder If there we cherish love or hate, Or, in the spheres we dream of yonder, A High and Low our souls await.

Come, bind thyself by prompt indenture, And thou mine arts with joy shalt see: What no man ever saw, I'll give to thee. When was a human soul, in its supreme endeavor, E'er understood by such as thou?

Yet, hast thou food which never satiates, now,— The restless, ruddy gold hast thou, That runs, quicksilver-like, one's fingers through,— A game whose winnings no man ever knew,— A maid that, even from my breast, Beckons my neighbor with her wanton glances, And Honor's godlike zest, The meteor that a moment dances,— Show me the fruits that, ere they're gathered, rot, And trees that daily with new leafage clothe them!

But still the time may reach us, good my friend. When peace we crave and more luxurious diet. There let, at once, my record end! Canst thou with lying flattery rule me, Until, self-pleased, myself I see,— Canst thou with rich enjoyment fool me, Let that day be the last for me!

The bet I offer. When thus I hail the Moment flying: "Ah, still delay—thou art so fair! Then let the death-bell chime the token.

Then art thou from thy service free! The clock may stop, the hand be broken, Then Time be finished unto me!

But one thing more! Beyond all risk to bind thee, Give me a line or two, I pray. Hast never known a man, nor proved his word's intent?

Is't not enough, that what I speak to-day Shall stand, with all my future days agreeing? In all its tides sweeps not the world away, And shall a promise bind my being?

Yet this delusion in our hearts we bear: Who would himself therefrom deliver? Blest he, whose bosom Truth makes pure and fair!

No sacrifice shall he repent of ever. Nathless a parchment, writ and stamped with care, A spectre is, which all to shun endeavor.

The word, alas! What wilt from me, Base Spirit, say? The terms with graver, quill, or chisel, stated? I freely leave the choice to thee. Each leaf for such a pact is good; And to subscribe thy name thou'lt take a drop of blood.

The promise that I make to thee Is just the sum of my endeavor. I have myself inflated all too high; My proper place is thy estate: The Mighty Spirit deigns me no reply, And Nature shuts on me her gate.

The thread of Thought at last is broken, And knowledge brings disgust unspoken. Let us the sensual deeps explore, To quench the fervors of glowing passion!

Let every marvel take form and fashion Through the impervious veil it wore! Plunge we in Time's tumultuous dance, In the rush and roll of Circumstance!

Then may delight and distress, And worry and success, Alternately follow, as best they can: Restless activity proves the man! Whether you everywhere be trying, Or snatch a rapid bliss in flying, May it agree with you, what you get!

Only fall to, and show no timid balking. I take the wildering whirl, enjoyment's keenest pain, Enamored hate, exhilarant disdain. My bosom, of its thirst for knowledge sated, Shall not, henceforth, from any pang be wrested, And all of life for all mankind created Shall be within mine inmost being tested: The highest, lowest forms my soul shall borrow, Shall heap upon itself their bliss and sorrow, And thus, my own sole self to all their selves expanded, I too, at last, shall with them all be stranded!

Trust one of us, this Whole supernal Is made but for a God's delight! He dwells in splendor single and eternal, But us he thrusts in darkness, out of sight, And you he dowers with Day and Night.

One only fear still needs repeating: The art is long, the time is fleeting. Then let thyself be taught, say I!

Go, league thyself with a poet, Give the rein to his imagination, Then wear the crown, and show it, Of the qualities of his creation,— The courage of the lion's breed, The wild stag's speed, The Italian's fiery blood, The North's firm fortitude!

Let him find for thee the secret tether That binds the Noble and Mean together. And teach thy pulses of youth and pleasure To love by rule, and hate by measure!

I'd like, myself, such a one to see: Sir Microcosm his name should be. Set wigs of million curls upon thy head, to raise thee, Wear shoes an ell in height,—the truth betrays thee, And thou remainest—what thou art.

We must arrange them now, more wisely, Before the joys of life shall pall. Why, Zounds! Both hands and feet are, truly— And head and virile forces—thine: Yet all that I indulge in newly, Is't thence less wholly mine?

If I've six stallions in my stall, Are not their forces also lent me? I speed along, completest man of all, As though my legs were four-and-twenty.

Take hold, then! I say to thee, a speculative wight Is like a beast on moorlands lean, That round and round some fiend misleads to evil plight, While all about lie pastures fresh and green.

Draw the latch! Shut the latch! Yes, sing away, sing on, and praise, and brag of her! I'll wait my proper time for laughter: Me by the nose she led, and now she'll lead you after.

Her paramour should be an ugly gnome, Where four roads cross, in wanton play to meet her: An old he-goat, from Blocksberg coming home, Should his good-night in lustful gallop bleat her!

A fellow made of genuine flesh and blood Is for the wench a deal too good. Greet her? Not I: unless, when meeting, To smash her windows be a greeting!

Hearken now to me! Confess, Sirs, I know how to live. Enamored persons here have we, And I, as suits their quality, Must something fresh for their advantage give.

Take heed! He sings. There was a rat in the cellar-nest, Whom fat and butter made smoother: He had a paunch beneath his vest Like that of Doctor Luther.

The cook laid poison cunningly, And then as sore oppressed was he As if he had love in his bosom. But nothing cured his raving. He whirled and jumped, with torment mad, And soon enough the poor beast had, As if he had love in his bosom.

Then laughed the murderess in her glee: "Ha! How the dull fools enjoy the matter! To me it is a proper art Poison for such poor rats to scatter.

The bald-pate pot-belly I have noted: Misfortune tames him by degrees; For in the rat by poison bloated His own most natural form he sees.

Before all else, I bring thee hither Where boon companions meet together, To let thee see how smooth life runs away. Here, for the folk, each day's a holiday: With little wit, and ease to suit them, They whirl in narrow, circling trails, Like kittens playing with their tails?

And if no headache persecute them, So long the host may credit give, They merrily and careless live. The fact is easy to unravel, Their air's so odd, they've just returned from travel: A single hour they've not been here.

You've verily hit the truth! Leipzig to me is dear: Paris in miniature, how it refines its people! Available via Hueber Verlag everywhere except: Japan.

Schon will er aus Enttäuschung sein Leben wegwerfen, da macht ihm Mephisto ein Angebot: Vergiss die fixen Ideen, stürz dich ins Vergnügen! Was dann folgt, ist jene bittere Geschichte, die Faust an den Rand des Wahnsinns treibt.

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Faust lesen, Faust verstehen Paperback, Delivery US shipping is usually within 11 to 15 working days. Product details Format: Paperback Language of text: German Isbn , Isbn Publisher: Aisthesis Verlag Series: Schriften der Darmstädter Goethe-Gesellschaft Publication date: Pages: 75 Product dimensions: mm w x mm h x 10mm d Overview Den Faust muss man lesen - und zwar langsam und sorgfaltig.

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Faust Online Lesen Kostenlos lesen: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe - Faust I, Der Tragödie erster Teil. Viele weitere kostenlose Bücher und Literatur der größten deutschen Künstler. ja halölo hab gerade angefangen goethes faust zu lesen und ja ich finds bis jetzt gut hätte aber mal ein kleine frage, also das mit direktor, theaterdichter und lustige person verstehe ich irgendwie nicht. wenn jemand das hier ließt könnte er/sie es mir vielleicht ja erklären. 4/6/ · Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. Ihr wollt zu einer fortgeschrittenen Szene? Weiter unten in der Videobeschreibung werdet ihr fübigmikeblog.com Anmerkung: Da, ich das ganze ein wenig unter Zeitd. ja halölo hab gerade angefangen goethes faust zu lesen und ja ich finds bis jetzt gut hätte aber mal ein kleine frage, also das mit direktor, theaterdichter und lustige person verstehe ich irgendwie nicht. wenn jemand das hier ließt könnte er/sie es mir vielleicht ja erklären. Read Faust online by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe at bigmikeblog.com, the free online library full of thousands of classic books. Now you can read Faust free from the comfort of your computer or mobile phone and enjoy other many other free books by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Goethe&#;s masterpiece and perhaps the greatest work in German literature, Faust has made the legendary German alchemist one of the central myths of the Western world. Here indeed is a monumental Faust, an audacious man boldly wagering with the devil, Mephistopheles, that no magic, sensuality, experience, or knowledge can lead him to a moment he would wish to last forever. Kostenlos lesen: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe - Faust I, Der Tragödie erster Teil. Viele weitere kostenlose Bücher und Literatur der größten deutschen Künstler. Kostenlos lesen: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe - Faust I, Der Tragödie erster Teil. Viele weitere kostenlose Bücher und Literatur der größten deutschen Künstler. Goethe Faust. Faust. Der Tragödie Erster Teil. Herausgegeben von Wolf Dieter Hellberg. Reclam Gar mancher kommt vom Lesen der Journale. Man eilt. Format, Url, Size. Read this book online: HTML, bigmikeblog.com​/h/bigmikeblog.com, kB. EPUB (no images). ja halölo hab gerade angefangen goethes faust zu lesen und ja ich finds bis jetzt gut hätte aber mal ein kleine frage, also das mit direktor.

Und mit diesem Bonus kГnnen Sie echtes Geld Faust Online Lesen. - Seitenbereiche:

Faust und Margarete kommen sich näher und gestehen sich ihre Zuneigung.

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1 Kommentar

  1. JoJorr

    Was es dir in den Kopf gekommen ist?

  2. Temuro

    Also, muss man so also, nicht sagen.

  3. Kagazahn

    Sie haben solche unvergleichliche Antwort schnell erdacht?

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